Is that a BlackBerry? No its the Motorola Defy Pro

First of all before everyone gets all worked up about the title, I am well aware that the Android OS is different from BlackBerry 7 and that the apps ecosystems are not the same.  However if we are looking at design and market specific targeting there is no doubt that the Motorola Defy Pro has been marketed and designed for the enterprise customer, and basically looks like a Bold 9900.

While many analysts and tech journalists are calling for RIM to “sell, sell, sell” before the ship completely sinks, let us talk frankly about the fact an Android OEM is copying what makes BlackBerry awesome.  The design of the Motorola Defy Pro is basically a Bold 9900 with a few minor changes to it.  I will even admit that at a quick glance I would state that it is a 9900, the keyboard looks almost identical as well as the silver bezel around the device, not to mention those very Bold-esque rounded corners.

 

When you look at it closer you can see that the materials are not as nice as the Bold, and that the back of it just looks awful, but Motorola cannot say this came up with the design all by their lonesome.  The truth is plain to see that they copied the BlackBerry Bold 9900, a device with the best physical keyboard on the market.  But why would Motorola copy a design from a company that everyone and their mother is saying will fail before year’s end?  Well obviously Motorola thinks that RIM did something right with the design of the 9900, and I couldn’t agree more.

I am of the opinion that the Bold 9900 is the best communication device bar none, however the operating system is lacking for me in this Android and iOS dominated world.  I would gladly use a Bold 9900 with a newly revamped operating system, like what we have seen from BlackBerry 10, but at the moment RIM  has nothing to offer me.  This is does not neglect the fact that other OEMs have realized that RIM makes one hell of a device, well at least in the higher end models, and that their designs are still current and worthy of newer devices.

The Motorola Defy is not going to sell millions of devices, it is a Gingerbread phone that is targeted for a select user base.  This is exactly what RIM has been talking about for their devices, new and existing.  RIM does not want to make a device for everyone, rather they want to make a device that will speak to a certain type of person whether they be in the enterprise market or just some kid that loves to bang out messages on a physical keyboard to his friends.  The idea of creating a device for everyone is a useless one, and any attempt to make it would be feeble and waste of time as there is no unicorn device that can suit everyone’s needs.  Therefore there is always room for a device like a BlackBerry, and in turn there will be copy-cat devices that attempt to be a BlackBerry in another platform’s clothing.

 

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  • http://twitter.com/RealPaul Paul Gilbert

    If the leadership of RIM had the same obsessions about control as Apple does, they would be suing Motorola for all sorts of design infringement. It would appear imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. The people at Motorola must secretly love their Blackberries.

  • Elena

    The only problem I have with this “imitation as a sincere form of flattery” idea is that everyone keeps bashing BB users. I myself am a BB user and love my Bold 9900. This move for Motorola to make a replica of the Bold is a cheap shot – as Android and iOS users still bash everything that makes BB awesome. I do know that RIM has an agreement with Motorola about the use of the QWERTY keyboard, but the aesthetics of the Motorola Defy Pro are too BB-esque – which RIM did not sign up for.
    I semi-agree with Paul in the notion that this imitation should be taken as flattery, but it’s also a double-edged sword. For as long as RIM keeps going down in value, preferably a Canadian Co. should sweep RIM out of their misery and help them get back up on their feet. BB are really awesome, they just need the same support that they had before going down in value…